Tour Scotland Video Of The Wedding Of My Daughter This Is What A Miracle Looks Like



A wee video clip of the wedding of my daughter in America. Her ancestry is from East Neuk of Fife, Scotland. She is my pride and joy. I pray that every ounce of joy that you have given to me as your father. is returned to you a hundred fold. Only then will you have a glimpse of the love I have for you. I wish you and your husband a lifetime of joyous moments and memories that you both can treasure forever. It has been my great joy to watch you grow from a young girl into a beautiful woman. Now that you have found each other, I wish you both a lifetime of love and laughter. I have loved you since the first time I met you on the day you were born, and I will love you forever.

As we say in Scotland,
May the best you have ever seen
Be the worst you will ever see
May a mouse never leave your girnal
With a tear drop in his eye
May you always keep hale and hearty
Till you are old enough to die
May you always be just as happy
As we wish you always to be

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Old Photograph Union Street West Calder Scotland


Old photograph of the Robert Gillon Grocers Shop on Union Street in West Calder in West Lothian, Scotland.

Notable people from West Calder include;

James Douglas was born on 21 March 1675 in West Calder. He was one of the seven sons of William Douglas, and his wife, Joan, daughter of James Mason of Park, Blantyre. In 1694 James Douglas graduated MA from the University of Edinburgh and then took his medical doctorate at Reims before going to London, England, in 1700. He worked as an obstetrician, and gaining a great reputation as a physician, was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of London in 1706. One of the most respected anatomists in the country, Douglas was also a well known man midwife. He was asked to investigate the case of Mary Toft, an English woman from Godalming, Surrey, who in 1726 became the subject of considerable controversy when she tricked doctors into believing that she had given birth to rabbits. Despite his early scepticism, Douglas thought that a woman giving birth to rabbits was as likely as a rabbit giving birth to a human child, Douglas went to see Toft, and subsequently exposed her as a fraud. Douglas died in London on 2 April 1742, leaving a widow and two children.

Robert McKeen, born 12 July 1884, died 5 August 1974, was a New Zealand politician of the Labour Party. He was Speaker of the House of Representatives. He was born in 1884 in Edinburgh and received his education in West Calder. In Scotland, he was active in the labour movement, and worked as a grocer's assistant in a co-operative store. He emigrated to New Zealand in 1909, and worked in coal mines on the West Coast before moving to Wellington, and a grocery store. He was a union official. He married Jessie Russell, the daughter of Robert Russell. He died in Otaki on 5 August 1974 and is buried at the Kelvin Grove Cemetery in Palmerston North.

John Kane, born August 19, 1860, died August 10, 1934, was an American painter celebrated for his skill in Na├»ve art. He was born John Cain to Irish parents in West Calder. His father died when he was age 10, leaving behind a widow and 7 children. His father was employed as a grave digger in West Calder, it is said that he dug a grave on Friday and filled it on Monday. The young Kane quit school to work in the shale mines. He actually worked at Youngs Parrafin works and was so struck with the malleability of the hot parrafin moulds that he made a mask of his own face for his mother Biddy. Naturally he burned his face, but not too seriously. After his mother remarried, he emigrated to the United States at age 19, following his stepfather and older brother Patrick, who had preceded him to America and were working in Braddock, Pennsylvania, just east of Pittsburgh. In both 1925 and 1926 he submitted paintings to the Carnegie Internationals sponsored by the Carnegie Museum of Art, but the works were rejected. The next year, however, Kane found a champion in painter juror Andrew Dasburg, who persuaded the jury to accept Kane’s Scene in the Scottish Highlands. The story of the untrained, now 67 year old. painter's success was trumpeted by the newspapers. The publicity around the show came to the notice of Kane's wife, who was living in West Virginia, and with whom he'd lost contact for over ten years. They reconciled and remained together during the last years of his life. John Kane died of tuberculosis on August 10, 1934 and is interred at Pittsburgh's Roman Catholic Calvary Cemetery.



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Old Photograph Golfers 8th Tee Golf Course Rothesay Scotland


Old photographs of golfers on the 8th Tee of the golf course in Rothesay, Isle of Bute, Scotland. During the Victorian era, Rothesay developed as a popular tourist destination. It became hugely popular with visitors from Glasgow. The course camee into existence on Burgh land to the west of the town, and had, in 1908, transferred to burgh land to the east. The driving force behind the formation of the golf club was Mr John Windsor Stuart, factor to the Marquess of Bute.



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Old Photograph Marriage Room Gretna Green Scotland


Old photograph of the Marriage Room in Gretna Green, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. A Scottish a village in the south of Scotland famous for runaway weddings. It is in Dumfries and Galloway, near the mouth of the River Esk and was historically the first village in Scotland, following the old coaching route from London to Edinburgh. Gretna Green is one of the world's most popular wedding destinations. Since 1929 both parties in Scotland have had to be at least 16 years old, but they still may marry without parental consent.



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Old Photograph Boys In Rowing Boat Harbour St Andrews Fife Scotland


Old photograph of boys in a rowing boats in the harbour in St Andrews, Fife, Scotland. On the 17th of August 1710, seven young St Andrews lads, full of adventure and with casual fishing in mind, left the safety of the stone harbour, rowing with enthusiasm their boat into the North Sea under a clear blue sky, as they had often done before. Soon a swell arose and before they could react, being several miles out from the harbour, they became caught out in a rather ferocious storm. They only carried basic picnic items of food and wine and were totally unprepared for the results of a storm. They were exposed and buffeted about, lost at sea for seven full days, till the boat eventually crashed on a rocky beach near Aberdeen, eighty kilometres up the coast from St Andrews. The boys were so worn out by thirst and fear and want of sleep, that they could scarcely crawl from the beach. The two eldest made the climb up the cliffs to raise help for their friends. A fisherman called Shepherd gave them aid, and medical help came from the local university, but it was much too late for two of the boys who soon died, of exposure and exhaustion.



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Old Photograph Falls of Blairgower Loch Awe Scotland


Old photograph of the Falls of Blairgower by Loch Awe, Scotland. One of the oldest Argyll clans, the Macarthurs owned lands around Loch Awe which was populated in close proximity with MacGregors, Campbells and Stewarts. It was from Loch Awe and surrounding area that Clan Campbell established itself as a powerful family. In 1308, Robert the Bruce defeated the Clan MacDougall at the Battle of the Pass of Brander downstream from the loch.



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