Tour Scotland Video Interior Of Greyfriars Tolbooth And Highland Kirk Edinburgh



Tour Scotland video of the interior of Greyfriars Tolbooth Kirk on ancestry visit to Edinburgh, Scotland. Greyfriars Kirk, today Greyfriars Tolbooth & Highland Kirk, is a parish kirk of the Church of Scotland in central Edinburgh. The kirk stands on the site of a pre Reformation establishment of the Franciscan order, the " Grey Friars ". Greyfriars Kirk has an important place in the history of the Scottish Covenanters. In 1638 the National Covenant was presented and signed in front of the pulpit. In 1679, some 1,200 Covenanters were imprisoned in the Kirkyard pending trial. Given the depopulation of Edinburgh's Old Town in the early part of the 20th century, many neighbouring church buildings were closed and their congregations united with Greyfriars, including the New North Church and Lady Yester's Church. In 1979 the congregation united with the former Highland Tolbooth St John's Church on the Royal Mile.

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Tour Scotland Video Inglis Stained Glass Window Greyfriars Tolbooth Highland Kirk Edinburgh



Tour Scotland video of the Inglis Memorial, stained glass window in Greyfriars Tolbooth Kirk on ancestry visit to Edinburgh, Scotland.

The Inglis surname is a Scottish form of the word referring to a Scottish border dweller of English as distinct from Celtic stock. Variant forms of the surname as it has evolved include Ingull, Ingle, Inglish and Ingliss. A famous Inglis was Charles Inglis, born 1731, died 1781, a rear admiral who was present at the Relief of Gibraltar in 1781.

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Tour Scotland Video Robertson Stained Glass Window Greyfriars Tolbooth Highland Kirk Edinburgh



Tour Scotland video of the Robertson Memorial, stained glass window in Greyfriars Tolbooth Kirk on ancestry visit to Edinburgh, Scotland.

Th Robertson surname is especially common in Scotland, where Robert was a popular personal name and the name of three kings of Scotland, including King Robert the Bruce, born 1274, died 1329. Donnachaidh Reamhair, otherwise Duncan, a descendant of the Royal House of Duncan through the Celtic earls of Atholl, was the ancestor of the Clan Robertson which came to prominence in 1306 when Robert the Bruce was defeated at the Battle of Methven, near Perth, and fled into Atholl for protection. The Clan fought at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, and Duncan's son was called Robert after the King. It is from him that the Robertson surname originates.

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Tour Scotland Video Erskine Stained Glass Window Greyfriars Tolbooth Highland Kirk Edinburgh



Tour Scotland video of the Erskine Memorial, stained glass window in Greyfriars Tolbooth Kirk on ancestry visit to Edinburgh, Scotland.

Erskine is a Scottish surname. The name is derived from a habitational name from a location; Erskine on the southern bank of the River Clyde, near Glasgow. This place was first recorded in 1225 as Erskin. Early spellings of the place include: Yrskin, Ireskin, Harskin and Irschen.

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Tour Scotland Video Finlayson Stained Glass Window Greyfriars Tolbooth Highland Kirk Edinburgh



Tour Scotland video of the Finlayson Memorial, stained glass window in Greyfriars Tolbooth Kirk on ancestry visit to Edinburgh, Scotland.

Finlayson is an ancient surname of Scottish origin and is the patronymic, son of, form of Finlay, and is the Anglicization of the Gaelic MacFhionnlaigh, and generally translated as fair hero, from the elements, fionn, meaning fair and laoch, meaning a warrior or hero.

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Tour Scotland Video Of Old Photographs Of Scapa Flow Orkney Islands



Tour Scotland video of old photographs of Scapa Flow, meaning bay of the long isthmus, a body of water in the Orkney Islands, Scotland. It is sheltered by the islands of Mainland, Graemsay, Burray, South Ronaldsay and Hoy. Scapa Flow had been used many times for exercises in the years before World War I , and when the time came for the British fleet to move to a northern station, Scapa Flow was chosen for the main base of the British Grand Fleet, even though it was also unfortified. Following the German defeat in World War I, 74 ships of the Imperial German Navy's High Seas Fleet were interned in Gutter Sound at Scapa Flow pending a decision on their future in the peace Treaty of Versailles. On 21 June 1919, after nine months of waiting, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter, the German officer in command at Scapa Flow, made the decision to scuttle the fleet because the negotiation period for the treaty had lapsed with no word of a settlement. After waiting for the bulk of the British fleet to leave on exercises, he gave the order to scuttle the ships to prevent their falling into British hands. The Royal Navy made desperate efforts to board the ships to prevent the sinkings, but the German crews had spent the idle months preparing for the order. The British did eventually manage to beach the battleship Baden, the light cruisers N├╝rnberg, and Frankfurt together with 18 destroyers, but the remaining 52 ships, the vast bulk of the High Seas Fleet, were sunk without loss of life. Nine German sailors died when British forces opened fire as they attempted to scuttle their ship, reputedly the last casualties of World War I. At least seven of the scuttled German ships, and a number of sunken British ships, can be visited by scuba divers. Of interest to folks with ancestry, genealogy or Scottish Family Roots in Scotland who may wish to visit one day.

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