Saturday, 20 January 2018

Old Travel Blog Photograph Pipe Band Johnstone Terrace Below The Castle In Edinburgh Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of a Pipe Band on Johnstone Terrace below Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh, Scotland. Edinburgh Castle is a historic fortress which dominates the skyline of the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, from its position on the Castle Rock.As the backdrop to the Edinburgh Military Tattoo during the annual Edinburgh International Festival the castle has become a recognisable symbol of Edinburgh and of Scotland and indeed, it is Edinburgh's most frequently visited visitor attraction.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Travel Blog Photograph Female Munition Workers And Scottish Command Staff Edinburgh Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of female Munition workers and Scottish Command Staff in Edinburgh, Scotland. Great Britain was divided into military districts on the outbreak of war with France in 1793. The Scottish District was commanded by the Commander in Chief, Scotland. In January 1876 a Mobilization Scheme for the forces in Great Britain and Ireland was published, with the Active Army divided into eight army corps based on the District Commands. 8th Corps was to be formed within Scottish Command, based at Edinburgh. This scheme disappeared in 1881, when the districts were retitled District Commands. VI Corps was to be formed in a reconstituted Scottish Command, with Headquarters at Edinburgh. Lieutenant General Sir Charles Tucker was appointed acting General Officer Commanding in Chief of VI Corps in April 1903. Scottish Command was established in 1905 at Edinburgh Castle but moved to Craigiehall in 1955.

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All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Travel Blog Photograph King's Own Scottish Borderers Caigton Camp Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of the 5th Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers at Caigton Camp by Castle Douglas near Threave Castle, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. The 5th Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers, Territorial Force, was established on 1st April 1908 by the amalgamation of the 3rd, Dumfries Volunteer Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers and the Galloway, Kirkcudbright and Wigtown, Volunteer Rifle Corps Stranraer. The battalion was renamed the 5th Dumfries and Galloway Battalion, King's Own Scottish Borderers in March 1909 and it was under this title that the battalion offered itself for service overseas on the outbreak of the First World War.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Travel Blog Photograph Northern And Scottish Airways Plane Glasgow Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of a Northern And Scottish Airways Spartan Cruiser, 8 seater, 6 passengers and 2 crew, airrcaft in Glasgow, Scotland. Highland Airways and Northern and Scottish Airways merged in 1938 to form Scottish Airways. From 1941 they carried airmail for the Air Ministry for troops stationed on the Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides. In 1945 the airline was authorised to operate an airway letter service one way between Stornoway and Glasgow until they were taken over by British European Airways in 1947. In addition to its Isle of Lewis routes, Scottish Airways also had a Glasgow, Renfrew to Campbeltown and Islay route, Northern and Scottish also operated for a short time on a route from Glasgow, Renfrew Airport to Hall Caine aerodrome on the Isle of Man.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Travel Blog Photograph Road To Davaar Island Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of the road to the coast by Davaar Island at the mouth of Campbeltown Loch off the east coast of Kintyre, in Argyll, Scotland. This uninhabited Scottish island is known for its seven caves, one of which contains a life size cave painting depicting the crucifixion, painted in 1887 by local artist Archibald MacKinnon after he had a vision in a dream suggesting him to do so.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Travel Blog Photograph James Gale Memorial Milngavie Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of the James Gale Memorial in Milngavie, a town in East Dunbartonshire, Scotland. An Art Nouveau style monument erected in 1904 outside the Milngavie water treatment works in honour of J M Gale, the Glasgow Corporation Water Works engineer. The memorial comprises a bronze plaque and drinking fountain with basin, the former bearing the words, " In Memory of James M Gale, engineer to the Glasgow Corporation Water Department 1859 to 1902. " The memorial was erected by the employees as a token of respect and esteem in 1904.



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Old Travel Blog Photograph Hairpin Bend On The Road To Aberfoyle Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of vintage vehicles on the hairpin bend on the road to Aberfoyle, Trossachs, Scotland. Aberfoyle has connections to many historical figures such as Rob Roy and Mary, Queen of Scots. Robert Roy MacGregor was born at the head of nearby Loch Katrine, and his well known cattle stealing exploits took him all around the area surrounding Aberfoyle. It is recorded, for example, that in 1691, the MacGregors raided every barn in the village of Kippen and stole all the villagers livestock.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Travel Blog Photograph Walking Path River Annan Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of the walking path by the River Annan at Annan near Dumfries, Scotland. The River Annan, Abhainn Anann in Gaelic, rises at Annanhead Hill and flows through the Devil's Beef Tub, Moffat and Lockerbie, reaching the sea at Annan, Dumfries and Galloway. It is one of the region's foremost fishing rivers. Annan stands on the River Annan from which it is named. It was at Annan in December 1332 that supporters of Robert The Bruce overwhelmed Balliol's forces to bring about the end of the first invasion of Scotland in the Second War of Scottish Independence. The Balliols and the Douglases were also more or less closely associated with Annan. During his retreat from Derby, Bonnie Prince Charlie stayed at an Inn on the High Street. Annan served as a maritime town whose shipyards built many clippers and other boats. Lieutenant-Colonel George Johnston, born in Annan on 19 March 1764, died 5 January 1823, was briefly Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales, Australia after leading the rebellion later known as the Rum Rebellion.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Travel Blog Photograph Duke Of Wellington Statue Falkirk Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of the Duke Of Wellington Statue on Newmarket Street in Falkirk, Scotland. Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, born 1 May 1769, died 14 September 1852, was an Anglo Irish soldier and statesman who was one of the leading military and political figures of 19th century Britain. His defeat of Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 put him in the first rank of Britain's military heroes. After the end of his active military career, Wellington returned to politics. He was twice British prime minister as part of the Tory party: from 1828 to 1830, and for a little less than a month in 1834. He oversaw the passage of the Catholic Relief Act 1829, but opposed the Reform Act 1832. He continued as one of the leading figures in the House of Lords until his retirement and remained Commander-in-Chief of the British Army until his death.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Travel Blog Photograph Road To Strathpeffer Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of the road to Strathpeffer, Scotland. In the Victorian era Strathpeffer was popular as a spa resort, owing to the discovery of sulphurous springs in the 18th century. The pump room in the middle of the village dates from 1819. Soon after that, a hospital and a hotel were also built. The Strathpeffer Pavilion dates from 1880, and was built to provide a venue for entertainment of the visitors. The railway station closed in February 1946. The Clach an Tiompain, in English, the Sounding Stone or The Eagle Stone is a small Class I Pictish stone located near the northern entrance of Strathpeffer. Of interest to folks with ancestry, genealogy or Scottish Family Roots in Scotland who may wish to visit one day.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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Old Travel Blog Photograph Launching Lusitania Clydebank Scotland


Old travel Blog photograph of the launching of the Lusitania ocean liner in 1906, at the John Brown and Company Shipyard in Clydebank by Glasgow, Scotland. This Scottish shipyard built many notable and world famous ships including RMS Lusitania, HMS Hood, HMS Repulse, RMS Queen Mary, RMS Queen Elizabeth and RMS Queen Elizabeth 2. At its height, from 1900 to the 1950s, it was one of the most highly regarded, and internationally famous, shipbuilding companies in the world. The sinking of the Cunard ocean liner RMS Lusitania occurred on Friday, 7 May 1915 during the First World War, as Germany waged submarine warfare against the United Kingdom which had implemented a naval blockade of Germany. The ship was identified and torpedoed by the German U-boat U-20 and sank in 18 minutes. The vessel went down 11 miles off the Old Head of Kinsale, Ireland, killing 1,198 and leaving 761 survivors. The sinking turned public opinion in many countries against Germany, contributed to the American entry into World War I and became an iconic symbol in military recruiting campaigns of why the war was being fought.



All photographs are copyright of Sandy Stevenson, Tour Scotland, and may not be used without permission.

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